Clemson University

Graduates: 3915
Undergraduates: 16950
Graduates: 3915
Setting: Large four-year, primarily residential
In-state Tuition: $12,230.00
Out-of-state Tuition: $29,664.00
Student/Faculty Ratio: 17:01
SAT / ACT / GPA: 1630 / 25 / 3.57
Public/Private: Public
Male/Female Ratio: 54:46
Campus Housing: Yes
Religious Affiliation: N/A
Campus Housing: Yes
Acceptance Rate: 57%

Clemson University is an American public, coeducational, land-grant and sea-grant research university located in Clemson, South Carolina, United States.
 
Founded in 1889, Clemson University consists of five colleges: Agriculture, Forestry and Life Sciences; Architecture, Arts and Humanities; Business and Behavioral Sciences; Engineering and Science; and Health, Education and Human Development. As of 2013, Clemson University enrolled a total of 16,931 undergraduate students for the fall semester and 4,372 graduate students and the student/faculty ratio is 16:1. The cost of in-state tuition is about $13,054 and out-of-state tuition is $30,488. According to US News and World Report, Clemson University ranks 21st among all national public universities.

Clemson University was established to fulfill our founder's vision of "a high seminary of learning" to develop "the material resources of the State" for the people of South Carolina. Nurtured by an abiding land grant commitment, Clemson has emerged as a research university with a global vision. Our primary purpose is educating undergraduate and graduate students to think deeply about and engage in the social, scientific, economic, and professional challenges of our times. The foundation of this mission is the generation, preservation, communication, and application of knowledge.

The University also is committed to the personal growth of the individual and promotes an environment of good decision making, healthy and ethical lifestyles, and tolerance and respect for others. Our distinctive character is shaped by a legacy of service, collaboration, and fellowship forged from and renewed by the spirit of Thomas Green Clemson's covenant.

Thomas Green Clemson, the university's founder, came to the foothills of South Carolina in 1838, when he married Anna Maria Calhoun, daughter of John C. Calhoun, a South Carolina statesman and seventh U.S. Vice President.When Clemson died on April 6, 1888, he left most of his estate, which he inherited from his wife, in his will to be used to establish a college that would teach scientific agriculture and the mechanical arts to South Carolinians.His decision was largely influenced by South Carolina Governor Benjamin Tillman. Tillman lobbied the South Carolina General Assembly to create the school as an agricultural institution for the state and the resolution passed by only one vote.
 
In his will, Clemson explicitly stated that he wanted the school to be modeled after what is now Mississippi State University: "This institution, I desire, to be under the control and management of a board of trustees, a part of whom are hereinafter appointed, and to be modeled after the Agricultural College of Mississippi as far as practicable."
 
In November 1889, South Carolina Governor John Peter Richardson III signed the bill, thus establishing the Clemson Agricultural College of South Carolina. As a result, federal funds for agricultural education from the Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act and the Hatch Act of 1887 were transferred from South Carolina College to Clemson.
 
Clemson Agricultural College formally opened in July 1893 with an initial enrollment of 446. From its beginning, the college was an all-white male military school. The school remained this way until 1955 when it changed to "civilian" status for students and became a coeducational institution.
 
In 1963, the school admitted its first African-American student, future Charlotte, North Carolina, mayor Harvey Gantt.In 1964, the college was renamed Clemson University as the state legislature formally recognized the school's expanded academic offerings and research pursuits.

The Campus of Clemson University was originally the site of U.S. Vice President John C. Calhoun's plantation, named Fort Hill. The plantation passed to his daughter, Anna, and son-in-law, Thomas Green Clemson. On Clemson's death in 1888, he willed the land to the state of South Carolina for the creation of a public university.

The university was founded in 1889, and three buildings from the initial construction still exist today: Hardin Hall (built in 1890), Tillman Hall (1894), and Godfrey Hall (1898). Other periods of large expansion occurred in 1936–1938, when 8 new buildings constructed, and the late 1950s through 1970, when no fewer than 25 buildings were constructed, most in a similar architectural style.


An open-membership, nonprofit organization since its inception in 1896, the Clemson Alumni Association exists to connect you with your fellow Tigers and with your alma mater. Check out the recent changes to the Alumni Association’s look and feel.


 


To keep you in-the-know on the latest news from campus and up-to-date on all of the important alumni events, check out the latest issue of The Echo eNewsletter.


 


Alumni Association:http://www.clemson.edu/alumni/

Chief_administrator: James F. Barker (President)
Fax: 8646562464
Phone: 8646564636
Geographic region: Southeast AL AR FL GA KY LA MS NC SC TN VA WV
Website: www.clemson.edu
Financial aid office website: www.clemson.edu/finaid/
Net price calculator web address: workgroups.clemson.edu/A_A_5690_OIR/cunpc/index.cgi
Online application website: https://www.applyweb.com/apply/clemson/
Admission office website: www.clemson.edu/admissions/index.html
Undergraduate application fee: $70.00
Graduate application fee: $80.00
Member of National Athletic Association: Yes
Member of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA): Yes
Member of National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIC): Yes
Member of National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA): Yes
Member of National Small College Athletic Association (NSCAA): No
Member of National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA): No