George Washington University

Graduates: 1029
Undergraduates: 10357
Graduates: 1029
Setting: Large four-year, highly residential
In-state Tuition: $45,122.00
Out-of-state Tuition: $45,122.00
Student/Faculty Ratio: 13:01
Public/Private: Private
Male/Female Ratio: 44:56
Campus Housing: Yes
Religious Affiliation: N/A
Campus Housing: Yes
Acceptance Rate: 43%

George Washington University is a private institution that was founded in 1821. It has a total undergraduate enrollment of 10,464, its setting is urban, and the campus size is 43 acres. It utilizes a semester-based academic calendar. George Washington University's ranking in the 2014 edition of Best Colleges is National Universities, 52. Its tuition and fees are $47,343 (2013-14).

The George Washington University, an independent academic institution chartered by the Congress of the United States in 1821, dedicates itself to furthering human well-being. The University values a dynamic, student-focused community stimulated by cultural and intellectual diversity and built upon a foundation of integrity, creativity, and openness to the exploration of new ideas. The George Washington University, centered in the national and international crossroads of Washington, D.C., commits itself to excellence in the creation, dissemination, and application of knowledge. To promote the process of lifelong learning from both global and integrative perspectives, the University provides a stimulating intellectual environment for its diverse students and faculty. By fostering excellence in teaching, the University offers outstanding learning experiences for full-time and part-time students in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs in Washington, D.C., the nation, and abroad. As a center for intellectual inquiry and research, the University emphasizes the linkage between basic and applied scholarship, insisting that the practical be grounded in knowledge and theory. The University acts as a catalyst for creativity in the arts, the sciences, and the professions by encouraging interaction among its students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the communities it serves. The George Washington University draws upon the rich array of resources from the National Capital Area to enhance its educational endeavors. In return, the University, through its students, faculty, and staff, and alumni, contributes talent and knowledge to improve the quality of life in metropolitan Washington, D.C.

Baptist missionary and leading minister Luther Rice raised funds to purchase a site for a college to educate citizens from throughout the young nation in Washington, D.C. A large building was constructed on College Hill, which is now known as Meridian Hill, and on February 9, 1821, President James Monroe approved the congressional charter creating the non-denominational Columbian College in the District of Columbia. The first commencement in 1824 was considered an important event for the young city of Washington, D.C. In attendance were President Monroe, John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, Marquis de Lafayette and other dignitaries. During the Civil War, most students left to join the Confederacy and the college's buildings were used as a hospital and barracks. Walt Whitman was among many of the volunteers to work on the campus. Following the war, in 1873, Columbian College became the Columbian University and moved to an urban downtown location centered on 15th and H streets, NW. George Washington, the university's namesake In 1904, Columbian University changed its name to the George Washington University in an agreement with the George Washington Memorial Association to build a campus building in honor of the first U.S. president. Neither the university nor the association were able to raise enough money for the proposed building near the National Mall; however, the institution retained the name. Eventually the association donated the remaining funds that had been raised to the university for the development of Lisner Auditorium. The university moved its principal operations to the D.C. neighborhood of Foggy Bottom in 1912. The George Washington University, like much of Washington, D.C., traces many of its origins back to the Freemasons. The Bible that the presidents of the university use to swear an oath on upon inauguration is the Bible of Freemason George Washington. Freemasonry symbols are prominently displayed throughout the campus including the foundation stones of many of the university buildings. Expansion The historic 1925 F Street Club currently serves as the President's Residence. International Monetary Fund buildings are seen behind it. The majority of the present infrastructure and financial stability at GW is due to the tenures of Presidents Cloyd Heck Marvin, Lloyd Hartman Elliott and Stephen Joel Trachtenberg. In the 1930s, the university was a major center for theoretical physics. The cosmologist George Gamow produced critical work on the Big Bang theory at GW in the 1930s and 1940s. In one of the most important moments in the 20th century, Niels Bohr announced that Otto Hahn had successfully split the atom on January 26, 1939, at the Fifth Washington Conference on theoretical physics in the Hall of Government. According to campus folklore, during the Vietnam War era, Thurston Hall, an undergraduate dormitory housing 1,116 students was a staging ground for Student Anti-War Demonstrations (at 1900 F Street NW, the building is 3 blocks from the White House). In 1996, the university purchased the Mount Vernon College for Women in the city's Palisades neighborhood that became the school's coeducational Mount Vernon Campus. The campus was first utilized in 1997 for women only, but became co-educational in a matter of years. The Mount Vernon campus is now totally integrated into the GW community, serving as a complement to the Foggy Bottom campus. In December 2006, the university named Johns Hopkins University provost Steven Knapp its next president. He began his presidency on August 1, 2007.

urban


George Washington alumni include many current and past political figures. Six alumni currently serve in the United States Senate and ten in the House of Representatives. These include Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor. Alumni have been governors of eighteen states and one territory, including current US Senator and former Governor of Virginia, Mark Warner, as well as former Governor of Guam, Frank Freyer. Other renowned figures of the higher echelons of the United States government include Senator J. William Fulbright, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Peter Pace, former FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, former CIA Director Allen Dulles and his brother, former Secretary of State, John Foster Dulles. In addition, the current Mayor of the District of Columbia, Vincent Gray, is a GWU alumnus. Other notable alumni and former students include HH Prince Talal Arslan, Anwar al-Awlaki, Ralph Asher Alpher, Red Auerbach, Alec Baldwin, Dana Bash, Chris Burnham, Larry Craig, Preston Cloud, Jack Edmonds, Philip Emeagwali, Jason Filardi, John Flaherty, Ina Garten, Glenn Greenwald, Todd B. Hawley, Erica Hayden, Harold Hersey, David Holt (politician), L. Ron Hubbard, S. M. Krishna, Lee Kun-hee, Roy Lee, Theodore N. Lerner, Randy Levine, Carl Lutz, David McConnell, T. J. Miller, Darla Moore, Jared Moskowitz. former First Lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis, Gregg Ritchie, Leslie Sanchez, Chuck Todd, Margaret Truman, Kerry Washington, Scott Wolf, Irvin Yalom and Rachel Zoe.


Chief_administrator: Steven Knapp (President)
Fax: 2029940325
Phone: 2029941000
Geographic region: Mid East DE DC MD NJ NY PA
Website: www.gwu.edu
Financial aid office website: gwired.gwu.edu/finaid/
Net price calculator web address: undergraduate.admissions.gwu.edu/net-price-calculator
Online application website: www.gwu.edu/apply/undergraduateadmissions/applytogw
Admission office website: www.gwu.edu/apply/
Undergraduate application fee: $75.00
Graduate application fee: $75.00
Member of National Athletic Association: Yes
Member of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA): Yes
Member of National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIC): Yes
Member of National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA): Yes
Member of National Small College Athletic Association (NSCAA): No
Member of National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA): No