Johns Hopkins University

Graduates: 914
Undergraduates: 6117
Graduates: 914
Setting: Large four-year, highly residential
In-state Tuition: $45,470.00
Out-of-state Tuition: $45,470.00
Student/Faculty Ratio: 0.500
SAT / ACT / GPA: 2117 / 32 / 3.74
Public/Private: Private
Male/Female Ratio: 51:49
Campus Housing: Yes
Religious Affiliation: N/A
Campus Housing: Yes
Acceptance Rate: 15%

The mission of The Johns Hopkins University is to educate its students and cultivate their capacity for life-long learning, to foster independent and original research, and to bring the benefits of discovery to the world.


The Johns Hopkins University (informally Johns Hopkins, JHU, or just Hopkins) is a not-for-profit private research university in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. The University was founded on January 22, 1876, and named for its benefactor, the philanthropist Johns Hopkins Daniel Coit Gilman was inaugurated as the first president on February 22, 1876 The institution pioneered the concept of the modern research university in the United States and has ranked among the world's top such universities throughout its history. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has ranked Johns Hopkins #1 among U.S. academic institutions in total science, medical and engineering research and development spending for 31 consecutive years As of 2011, 37 Nobel Prize winners have been affiliated with Johns Hopkins over the course of 120 years. The university's research has been ranked as the third most cited of any institution globally, earning it a far-reaching reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world

The mission of The Johns Hopkins University is to educate its students and cultivate their capacity for life-long learning, to foster independent and original research, and to bring the benefits of discovery to the world.

At that time this fortune, generated primarily from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, was the largest philanthropic gift in the history of the United States. On his death in 1873, Johns Hopkins, a Quaker entrepreneur and childless bachelor, bequeathed $7 million (between $140 million to $1.6 billion in 2011 dollars, by varying estimates) to fund a hospital and university in Baltimore, Maryland The first name of philanthropist Johns Hopkins is the surname of his great-grandmother, Margaret Johns, who married Gerard Hopkins. They named their son Johns Hopkins, who named his own son Samuel Hopkins. Samuel named one of his sons after his father and that son would be the university's benefactor. Milton Eisenhower, a former university president, once spoke at a convention in Pittsburgh where the Master of Ceremonies introduced him as "President of John Hopkins." Eisenhower retorted that he was "glad to be here in Pittburgh The original board opted for an entirely novel university model dedicated to the discovery of knowledge at an advanced level, extending that of contemporary Germany. Johns Hopkins thereby became the model of the modern research university in the United States. Its success eventually shifted higher education in the United States from a focus on teaching revealed and/or applied knowledge to the scientific discovery of new knowledge. The founders intended the university to be national in scope to strengthen ties across a divided country in the aftermath of the American Civil War. The university's inaugural date was symbolic: 1876 was the nation's centennial year and February 22 was George Washington's birthday. The trustees worked alongside three notable university presidents - Charles W. Eliot of Harvard, Andrew D. White of Cornell, and James B. Angell of Michigan - who each vouched for Daniel Coit Gilman to lead the new University as its first president. Gilman, a Yale-educated scholar, had been serving as president of the University of California prior to this appointment. In preparation for the university's founding, Gilman visited University of Freiburg and other German universities. Johns Hopkins would become the first American university committed to research by the German education model of Alexander von Humboldt Gilman launched what many at the time considered an audacious and unprecedented academic experiment to merge teaching and research. He dismissed the idea that the two were mutually exclusive: "The best teachers are usually those who are free, competent and willing to make original researches in the library and the laboratory," he stated. To implement his plan, Gilman recruited internationally known luminaries such as the mathematician James Joseph Sylvester; the biologist H. Newell Martin; the physicist Henry A. Rowland (the first president of the American Physical Society), the classical scholars Basil Gildersleeve and Charles D. Morris; the economist Richard T. Ely; and the chemist Ira Remsen, who became the second president of the university in 1901. Gilman focused on the expansion of graduate education and support of faculty research. The new university fused advanced scholarship with such professional schools as medicine and engineering. Hopkins became the national trendsetter in doctoral programs and the host for numerous scholarly journals and associations. The Johns Hopkins University Press, founded in 1878, is the oldest American university press in continuous operation. With the completion of Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1889 and the medical school in 1893, the university's research�focused mode of instruction soon began attracting world-renowned faculty members who would become major figures in the emerging field of academic medicine, including William Osler, William Halsted, Howard Kelly, and William Welch. During this period Hopkins made more history by becoming the first medical school to admit women on an equal basis with men and to require a Bachelors degree, based on the efforts of Mary E. Garrett, who had endowed the school at Gilman's request. The school of medicine was America's first coeducational, graduate-level medical school, and became a prototype for academic medicine that emphasized bedside learning, research projects, and laboratory training. In his will and in his instructions to the trustees of the university and the hospital, Hopkins requested that both institutions be built upon the vast grounds of his Baltimore estate, Clifton. When Gilman assumed the presidency, he decided that it would be best to use the university's endowment for recruiting faculty and students, deciding to "build men, not buildings." In his will Hopkins stipulated that none of his endowment should be used for construction; only interest on the principal could be used for this purpose. Unfortunately, stocks in The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which would have generated most of the interest, became virtually worthless soon after Hopkins's death. The university's first home was thus in Downtown Baltimore delaying plans to site the university in Clifton. This decision became the only major criticism of Gilman's presidency. In the early 20th century the university outgrew its buildings and the trustees began to search for a new home. Developing Clifton for the university was too costly, and so the estate was sold as a public park. A solution was achieved by a team of prominent locals who acquired the estate in north Baltimore known as Homewood. On February 22, 1902, this land was formally transferred to the university. The flagship building, Gilman Hall, was completed in 1915. The School of Engineering relocated in Fall of 1914 and the School of Arts and Sciences followed in 1916. These decades saw the ceding of lands by the university for the public Wyman Park and Wyman Park Dell and the Baltimore Museum of Art, coalescing in the contemporary area of 140 acres (57 ha). Prior to becoming the main Johns Hopkins campus, the Homewood estate had initially been the gift of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a Maryland planter and signer of the Declaration of Independence, to his son Charles Carroll Jr. The original structure, the 1801 Homewood House, still stands and serves as an on-campus museum. The brick and marble Federal style of Homewood House became the architectural inspiration for much of the university campus. This fact explains the distinctively local flavour of the campus as compared to the Collegiate Gothic style of other historic American universities. In 1909, the university was among the first to start adult continuing education programs and in 1916 it founded the US' first school of public health.

140 acres (57 ha).

Chief_administrator: Mr. Ronald J. Daniels (President)
Fax: 4105166025
Phone: 4105168000
Geographic region: Mid East DE DC MD NJ NY PA
Website: www.jhu.edu
Financial aid office website: apply.jhu.edu/finaid/finaid.html
Net price calculator web address: npc.collegeboard.org/student/app/jhu
Online application website: apply.jhu.edu/apply/application.html
Admission office website: apply.jhu.edu/index.html
Undergraduate application fee: $70.00
Graduate application fee: $75.00
Member of National Athletic Association: Yes
Member of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA): Yes
Member of National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIC): Yes
Member of National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA): Yes
Member of National Small College Athletic Association (NSCAA): No
Member of National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA): No