Marshall University

Graduates: 2569
Undergraduates: 9762
Graduates: 2569
Setting: Large four-year, primarily residential
In-state Tuition: $5,140.00
Out-of-state Tuition: $13,370.00
Student/Faculty Ratio: 19:01
SAT / ACT / GPA: 1110 / 22 / 3.40
Public/Private: Public
Male/Female Ratio: 43:57
Campus Housing: Yes
Religious Affiliation: N/A
Campus Housing: Yes
Acceptance Rate: 76%

Marshall University is a coeducational public research university in Huntington, West Virginia, United States founded in 1837, and named after John Marshall, the fourth Chief Justice of the United States

The Information Technology Organization at Marshall University provides and creates an evolving, reliable, innovative, integrated and service-oriented information technology environment that empowers, enhances and engages the academic, support and research activities of the University by delivering effective IT products and services that help students, faculty, and staff to achieve Marshall University goals. Marshall University is a multi-campus public university providing innovative undergraduate and graduate education that contributes to the development of society and the individual. To view Marshall University Mission Statement, please click here.

Marshall University was founded in 1837 as a private subscription school by residents of Guyandotte and the surrounding area. The landmark Old Main, which now serves as the primary administrative building for the university, was built on land known as Maple Grove, at the time the home of the Mount Hebron Church in what was then the state of Virginia. John Laidley, a local attorney, hosted the meeting which led to the founding of Marshall Academy, which was named after Laidley's friend, the eminent John Marshall who had served as the fourth Chief Justice of the United States from January 1801 to July 1835. On March 30, 1838, the institution was formally dedicated by the Virginia General Assembly as Marshall Academy; however this institution was not a college level institution as that was understood at that time. In 1858, the Virginia General Assembly changed the name to Marshall College, but this change still did not reflect its status as a true college. The Civil War closed the often financially challenged school for much of the 1860s. Old Main is the oldest building on campus and home to many of the university's administrative offices. Marshall University's John Deaver Drinko Library, which opened in 1998. On June 20, 1863, Cabell County, Virginia, was one of the 50 counties separated from Virginia at the height of the American Civil War to form the State of West Virginia, and the college fell within the new state. In 1867, the West Virginia Legislature resurrected the institution as a teacher training facility and renamed it State Normal School of Marshall College. This began the history of the college as a state-supported post-secondary institution. 20th century With the exception of the Old Main building, expansion of the facilities and the college itself did not begin until 1907, when the West Virginia Board of Regents changed the title of the presiding officer from "principal" to "president" and allowed the creation of new college-level departments.At that time, enrollment surpassed 1,000 students. The school began offering four-year degrees for the first time in 1920. In 1937, the college suffered through a devastating flooding by the Ohio River. Numerous structures, such as Northcott Hall and the James E. Morrow Library were extensively flooded. Much of Huntington was also heavily damaged, and as a result, a floodwall was constructed around much of the town to prevent future occurrences. The West Virginia Board of Education authorized Marshall College in 1938 to offer the master's degree in six programs: chemistry, education, history, political science, psychology, and sociology, as the institution underwent another expansion. In that year the school was accredited as a "university level institution"; however, elevation to university status would remain a contentious political issue for decades to come. Further expansion accelerated after World War II. In 1960, John F. Kennedy spoke at the college during his cross-country campaign for the presidency. On March 2, 1961, West Virginia Legislature finally elevated Marshall to university status, and the legislation was signed by Governor W. W. Barron. The student newspaper, The Parthenon, prepared two front pages for the day, depending on the outcome of the legislature's vote. Also in 1961, WMUL-FM began operations as the first public radio station in West Virginia. The station, which began in the Science Building at 10 watts of power, now broadcasts from the Communications Building with 1,400 watts. In 1969, the university's athletic program, facing a number of scandals, fired both its football and basketball coaches and was suspended from the Mid-American Conference and from the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The university rebuilt its athletic program back to respectability, and in 1977, the university joined the Southern Conference.

urban, 100 acres (400,000 m�)


The Marshall University Alumni Association has more than 35,000 alumni. This is a list of the nationwide alumni clubs. California Southern California Club Florida Central Florida Club Jacksonville, Florida Club Palm Beach, Florida Club Sarasota/Bradenton Club South Florida Club Southwest Florida Club Tampa/St. Petersburg Club Georgia Atlanta, Georgia Club Maryland Baltimore, Maryland Club New York New York City Game Watching Club


Chief_administrator: Dr. Stephen James Kopp (President)
Phone: 8006423463
Geographic region: Southeast AL AR FL GA KY LA MS NC SC TN VA WV
Website: www.marshall.edu/
Financial aid office website: www.marshall.edu/wpmu/sfa/
Net price calculator web address: marshall.studentaidcalculator.com/survey.aspx
Online application website: www.marshall.edu/admissions/apply.asp
Admission office website: www.marshall.edu/admissions/
Undergraduate application fee: $30.00
Graduate application fee: $40.00
Member of National Athletic Association: Yes
Member of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA): Yes
Member of National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIC): Yes
Member of National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA): Yes
Member of National Small College Athletic Association (NSCAA): No
Member of National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA): No