Oglethorpe University

Graduates: 62
Undergraduates: 1073
Graduates: 62
Setting: Suburban
In-state Tuition: $31,000.00
Out-of-state Tuition: $31,000.00
Student/Faculty Ratio: 13:01
SAT / ACT / GPA: 1696 / 24 / 3.49
Public/Private: Private
Male/Female Ratio: 42:58
Campus Housing: Yes
Religious Affiliation: N/A
Campus Housing: Yes
Acceptance Rate: 78%

Oglethorpe University is a private liberal arts college in Brookhaven, an inner suburb of Atlanta, in the U.S. state of Georgia. It was chartered in 1835 and named after James Edward Oglethorpe, the state's founder.

Oglethorpe University provides a superior education in the liberal arts and sciences and selected professional disciplines in a coeducational, largely residential, small-college environment within a dynamic urban setting. Oglethorpe�s academically rigorous programs emphasize intellectual curiosity, individual attention and encouragement, close collaboration among faculty and students, and active learning in relevant field experiences. Oglethorpe is committed to supporting the success of all students in a diverse community characterized by civility, caring, inquiry, and tolerance. Oglethorpe�s talented, self-reliant, and motivated graduates are prepared to make a life and to make a living, to grow as life-long learners, and to be energetic and intelligent contributors in a rapidly changing world.

Oglethorpe University was chartered in 1835 in Midway, just south of the city of Milledgeville, then the state capital. The school was built and, at that time, governed by the Presbyterian Church, making it one of the South's earliest denominational institutions. The American Civil War led to the school's closing from 1862 to 1866. The college followed the relocation of the capital to Atlanta. In 1870, it began holding classes at the present site of Atlanta City Hall. Plagued by financial difficulties, the school closed its doors two years later. Oglethorpe College was re-chartered as a non-denominational institution in 1913. In 1915 the cornerstone to the new campus was laid at its present location on Peachtree Road in Brookhaven. The person behind rebuilding Oglethorpe was Dr. Thornwell Jacobs, whose grandfather, Professor Ferdinand Jacobs, had served on the faculty of Old Oglethorpe. Jacobs would serve as president for nearly three decades. In the early 1940s Oglethorpe University had a medical school. Under the direction of Dr. John Bernard, the university was given several elephants for research, who had been poisoned by the Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus. After the students had finished dissecting the animals they were buried under what is known today as the Philip Weltner Library. Oglethorpe University became Oglethorpe College in 1965, and reclaimed the designation "university" several years later. Many of Oglethorpe's campus buildings were built in a Gothic revival architecture style. This area of the 100-acre (0.40 km2) campus is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

Suburban, 100 acres (400,000 m�)


Luke Appling, member of the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame; class of 1932. David-Matthew Barnes, class of 2006; novelist, playwright, poet, and filmmaker. Jazz musician John G. Blowers, Jr.; former drummer for Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong, and the Harlem Blues & Jazz Band. Josh Caray, class of 2004; play-by-play announcer for South Atlantic League Rome Braves. William C. Kavanaugh, class of 1940; former member of the Wisconsin State Assembly. Sidney Lanier, class of 1860; poet of post-Civil War era. Benjamin M. Palmer, class of 1852; first national moderator of Presbyterian Church, based in New Orleans. Vincent Sherman, class of 1925; Hollywood film director with more than 30 movies to his credit, including Mr. Skeffington (1944) and The Young Philadelphians (1959). Charles Weltner, class of 1948; former U.S. representative, Georgia Supreme Court Justice and recipient of the Profiles in Courage Award. Mark Lavery, class of 2012; professional soccer player.


Website: www.oglethorpe.edu
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Member of National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA):