Texas State University-San Marcos

Graduates: 4089
Undergraduates: 31005
Graduates: 4089
Setting: Suburban
In-state Tuition: $6,829.00
Out-of-state Tuition: $17,449.00
Student/Faculty Ratio: 20:01
Public/Private: Public
Male/Female Ratio: 44:56
Campus Housing: Yes
Religious Affiliation: N/A
Campus Housing: Yes
Acceptance Rate: 72%

Texas State University is a state university located in San Marcos, Texas, United States. Established in 1899 as the Southwest Texas State Normal School, it opened its doors in 1903 to 303 students with

Texas State University is a public, student-centered, Emerging Research University dedicated to excellence in serving the educational needs of the diverse population of Texas and the world beyond.

The Southwest Texas State Normal School was proposed in a March 3, 1899, bill by Texas State Representative Fred Cocke. Cocke represented the citizens of Hays and surrounding counties where the school was to be located. While there was opposition to the bill, with the support of State Senator J.B. Dibrell, it was finally passed and signed into law on May 10, 1899, by Governor Joseph D. Sayers. The school's purpose was to provide manual training and teach domestic sciences and agriculture. Any students earning a diploma and teaching certificate from the school would be authorized to teach in the state's public schools. In October 1899, the San Marcos City Council voted to donate 11 acres (45,000 m2) of land at what was known as Chautauqua Hill for the school to be built on. It was not until 1901 that the Texas legislature accepted this donation and approved $25,000 to be used for construction of buildings on the site. The building now known as Old Main was completed and the school opened its doors to its first enrollment of 303 students in September 1903. In 1912, the San Marcos School Board began a partnership with the school to allow Southwest Texas State Normal School students instruct local school children as part of their training to become teachers. The San Marcos East End Ward School, comprising the first eight grades of the school district, was moved onto the Southwest Texas State campus in 1917. In 1935, a formal contract between Southwest Texas State Teachers College, as it was known then, and the San Marcos school district for the "Public Schools to become the laboratory school for said Teachers College." The school would be under the control and supervision of the city of San Marcos but Southwest Texas State was responsible for providing and maintaining buildings and equipment for the city's elementary and junior high schools.:15�18 On November 8, 1965, the school's most famous alumnus, United States President Lyndon B. Johnson returned to his alma mater to sign the Higher Education Act of 1965 which was part of his Great Society. In a speech, held in Strahan Coliseum on the school's campus, prior to signing the bill, he recounted his own difficulties affording to go to college: having to shower and shave in the school's gymnasium, living above a faculty member's garage, and working multiple jobs

457 Acres


Texas State University's most notable alumnus is U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson. Johnson attended the university, then known as the Southwest Texas State Teachers College, from 1927 until 1930 when he earned his Bachelor of Science degree. As a student, Johnson participated on the debate team and was an editor for the student newspaper, then known as the College Star.00 As of the 2012 elections, Johnson remains the only U.S. President who graduated from a university in the state of Texas.00 Another notable alum is Grammy Award-winning American country music singer George Strait. Strait graduated in 1979 from the university, then known as Southwest Texas State University, with a Bachelor of Science in agriculture. As a student, Strait performed his first show with the Ace in the Hole Band. In 2006, Strait was given an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters by University President Denise Trauth.00 Other notable alumni include: General Robert L. Rutherford, United States Air Force; actor Bill Paxton; writer and Academy Award nominee Kim Krizan;Texas Country singer Randy Rogers of the Randy Rogers Band; ATP Oil and Gas Chairman and Chief Executive Officer T. Paul Bulmahn; musician Scott H. Biram; actor Powers Boothe;0 writer Tom�s Rivera;0 Texas State Representative Alfred P.C. Petsch; columnist "Heloise" (Ponce Cruse Evans); and mathematician and former president of the American Mathematical Society R. H. Bing. As well as current Arizona Diamondback first baseman Paul Goldschmidt


Website: www.txstate.edu/?
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Member of National Small College Athletic Association (NSCAA):
Member of National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA):