University of California

Graduates: 2466
Undergraduates: 18621
Graduates: 2466
Setting: Urban
In-state Tuition: $11,220.00
Out-of-state Tuition: $34,098.00
Student/Faculty Ratio: 19:01
SAT / ACT / GPA: 1627 / 23 / 3.60
Public/Private: Public
Male/Female Ratio: 48:52
Campus Housing: Yes
Religious Affiliation: N/A
Campus Housing: Yes
Acceptance Rate: 58%

The University of California, Riverside (UCR or UC Riverside), is a public research university and one of the 10 general campuses of the University of California system. The main campus sits on 1,900 acres (769 ha) in a suburban district of Riverside, California, United States, with a branch campus of 20 acres (8 ha) in Palm Desert. Founded in 1907 as the UC Citrus Experiment Station, Riverside, pioneered research in biological pest control and the use of growth regulators responsible for extending the citrus growing season in California from four to nine months. Some of the world's most important research collections on citrus diversity and entomology, as well as science fiction and photography, are located at Riverside.
 
UCR's undergraduate College of Letters and Science opened in 1954. The Regents of the University of California declared UCR a general campus of the system in 1959, and graduate students were admitted in 1961. To accommodate an enrollment of 21,000 students by 2015, more than $730 million has been invested in new construction projects since 1999. Preliminary accreditation of the UCR School of Medicine was granted in October 2012 and the first class of 50 students was enrolled in August 2013. It is the first new research-based public medical school in 40 years.

The University of California, Riverside serves the needs and enhances the quality of life of the diverse people of California, the nation and the world through knowledge  its communication, discovery, translation, application, and preservation. The undergraduate, graduate and professional degree programs; research programs; and outreach activities develop leaders who inspire, create, and enrich Californias economic, social, cultural, and environmental future.

With its roots as a Citrus Experiment Station, UC Riverside is guided by its land grant tradition of giving back by addressing some of the most vexing problems facing society. Whether it is assuring a safe, nutritious, and affordable food supply; stimulating the human mind and soul through the humanities and arts; or finding solutions to the profound challenges in education, engineering, business, healthcare, and the environment, UC Riverside is living the promise.

At the turn of the 20th century, Southern California was a major producer of citrus, the region's primary agricultural export. The industry developed from the country's first navel orange trees, planted in Riverside in 1873. Lobbied by the citrus industry, the UC Regents established the UC Citrus Experiment Station (CES) on February 14, 1907, on 23 acres (9 ha) of land on the east slope of Mount Rubidoux in Riverside. The station conducted experiments in fertilization, irrigation and crop improvement. In 1917, the station was moved to a larger site, 475 acres (192 ha) near Box Springs Mountain.

The 1944 passage of the GI Bill during World War II set in motion a rise in college enrollments that necessitated an expansion of the state university system in California. A local group of citrus growers and civic leaders, including many UC Berkeley alumni, lobbied aggressively for a UC-administered liberal arts college next to the CES. State Senator Nelson Dilworth, former Assemblyman Philip L. Boyd and Riverside State Assemblyman John Babbage were instrumental in shepherding the legislation through the State Legislature. Governor Earl Warren signed the bill in 1949, allocating $2 million for initial campus construction. Gordon S. Watkins, dean of the College of Letters and Science at UCLA, became the first provost of the new college at Riverside. Initially conceived of as a small college devoted to the liberal arts, he ordered the campus built for a maximum of 1,500 students and recruited many young junior faculty to fill teaching positions. He presided at its opening with 65 faculty and 127 students on February 14, 1954, remarking, "Never have so few been taught by so many." UCR's enrollment exceeded 1,000 students by the time Clark Kerr became president of the UC system in 1958. Anticipating a "tidal wave" in enrollment growth required by the baby boom generation, Kerr developed the California Master Plan for Higher Education and the Regents designated Riverside a general university campus in 1959. UCR's first chancellor, Herman Theodore Spieth, oversaw the beginnings of the school's transition to a full university and its expansion to a capacity of 5,000 students.

UCR's second chancellor, Ivan Hinderaker led the campus through the era of the free speech movement and kept student protests peaceful in Riverside. According to a 1998 interview with Hinderaker, the city of Riverside received negative press coverage for smog after the mayor asked Governor Ronald Reagan to declare the South Coast Air Basin a disaster area in 1971; subsequent student enrollment declined by up to 25% through 1979. Hinderaker's development of innovative programs in business administration and biomedical sciences created incentive for enough students to enroll at Riverside to keep the campus open. Entrance along University Avenue. The Arts Building is visible in the background. (2007) In the 1990s, the UC experienced a new surge of enrollment applications, now known as "Tidal Wave II". The Regents targeted UCR for an annual growth rate of 6.3%, the fastest in the UC system, and anticipated 19,900 students at UCR by 2010. By 1995, African American, American Indian, and Latino student enrollments accounted for 30% of the UCR student body, the highest proportion of any UC campus at the time. The 1997 implementation of Proposition 209 which banned the use of affirmative action by state agencies reduced the ethnic diversity at the more selective UC campuses but further increased it at UCR.

With UCR scheduled for dramatic population growth, efforts have been made to increase its popular and academic recognition. The students voted for a fee increase to move UCR athletics into NCAA Division I standing in 1998. In the 1990s, proposals were made to establish a law school, a medical school, and a school of public policy at UCR, with the UCR School of Medicine and the School of Public Policy becoming reality in 2012. In June 2006, UCR received its largest gift, 15.5 million from two local couples, in trust towards building its medical school. The Regents formally approved UCR's medical school proposal in 2006. Projected to be completed by 2013, it will be the first new medical school in 40 years built in California.

UCR's main campus sits at an elevation of 1,100 ft (340 m) to 1,450 ft (440 m) near Box Springs Mountain, 3 miles (5 km) east of downtown Riverside, and comprises 1,112 acres (450 ha) divided into eastern and western areas by the State Route 60 freeway.


Dr. Richard R. Schrock: Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and winner of the 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Steve Breen: Editorial cartoonist and two time Pulitzer Prize winner (1998 and 2009) Billy Collins: The 11th U.S. Poet Laureate Tim D. White: Paleoanthropologist  named one of Time Magazine's "100 Most Influential People of 2010" for his work with Lucy, one of the oldest known Hominin. Charles E. Young: UCR's first student body president, later became Chancellor of UCLA.



Alumni Association:www.alumni.ucr.edu


Website: www.ucr.edu/
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